20/20 Optics

Sept 4 – Oct 3, 2020

This exhibition features works by five regional artists Sheri Grube, Sharol Nau, Michael Ruth, Erika Terwilliger and Annie Young.


FEATURED ARTISTS:

Sheri Grube

I use art to transfer myself to another universe. I find a beautiful place and travel through my paintings. My paintings convey my excitement and feelings about the places I travel.  Art is a form of therapy for me; I have Dystonia in my jaws, neck and shoulder. Dystonia is a chronic, often painful, neurological disorder characterized by extreme muscle spasms that cause involuntary movements and postures in the body and limbs. . If I am tremoring, I pick up a paintbrush and the tremor stops. Pretty interesting what your brain can do.


Sharol Nau

I was helping sort books at an annual book sale that benefits a local hospital when it occurred to me that a good portion of the books would be left unsold and possibly end up in a landfill. I was looking for a new idea for my creative thinking so on the last day of the sale I bought some of these recycled books for experimentation. I wasn’t considering incorporating math in the experiments at first but that soon changed when I started to incorporate the parabola, the longest crease problem among others to fuel my creative energy.  Book folding is the art of folding the individual pages in a book to create a small sculpture.


Michael Ruth

Needless to say that the Coronavirus has greatly impacted the psyche of people all across the globe. One not need be an artist to see and feel the emotional change that has taken place. Being in this situation we find ourselves is that it does impact the creative structure of our minds. What we are creating now, may never be repeated once this pandemic is past.  This could be viewed as one of the creative times in modern history.

Since late February I have been creating a series which I call “Pandemia”.  The series is made up of digital visuals that are sequential representing, to me, the spread of COVID-19


Erika Terwilliger

Through my practice I’m interested in taking stock of the mundane objects and materials that surround me. I want to care for these things, but in a way that eventually wears them into nothing. I want to work within systems that toe the line of absurdity, but still know when it’s time to shed their lining. Every year my family picks, peels, cans, and stores 40 quarts of pears. The fruit moves from tree to kitchen to jar to shelf to table to human to toilet. I’m interested in the evolving relationship between object and container, value and utility, and the labor required to move domestic objects through these progressing stages of use and value.

Currently I am building ceramic and plant-based sculptures inspired by roof vents. Over the course of the summer these pieces, which I’ve planted with a variety of cover crops like alfalfa and clover, will grow and change as the plant roots take the shape of their ceramic container. At the end of the growing season I will open the molds to reveal the sculptural plantings inside. Through this work I consider how buildings like barns and houses can act like bodies, maintaining homeostasis through ventilation and moisture control for the organisms they contain.


Annie Young

Painting has always been a means for me to communicate what I am unable to say using words. I had looked forward to exhibiting in the year 2020 because as a person and artist living without the use of my eyesight, I was eager to ‘play’ on the idea of what 20/20 vision actually meant. And, in a way, this collection does just that. Maybe not in the way I envision it would (pun intended). I typically paint with bright, brilliant, bold colors. Lots of them. However, I found myself painting with merely two or three.  Most often blues or greens. I reached for white to add contrast and from time to time orange if necessary, possibly yellow. Again, this is so unlike me. Very unusual.

My process is dictated by my dreams. I have no say really. And my dreams have been simple. Very simple. And I trust my process, my dreams. So I paint out what I dream and when I do, I am rewarded. I received this was of peace to my soul. A calming. It is my hope those who view will experience the same.

To see more upcoming exhibitions, scroll over the photos below